Author Archives: livelongday

About livelongday

Assistant Professor of German Studies Co-Editor of Critical Multilingualism Studies | cms.arizona.edu Co-Investigator, Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law, and the State | http://researching-multilingually-at-borders.com

Steganographic Cover art

My book The Invention of Monolingualism has been out for a few months now, and I’ve enjoyed seeing it in the hands of friends, strangers, colleagues, teachers, and researchers. One particular aspect of the process I’ve been pleased about is the … Continue reading

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Fisch out of Water — à la carte!

The German Studies Department and the Deutscher Studenten Club celebrated the sixth year of Fisch out of Water on October 27, at Cafe Passé. With performances and readings in Spanish, Turkish, German, Hebrew, and French, around fifty members of the Tucson … Continue reading

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New essay on Pina Bausch

A new essay, entitled “Seven Types of Multilingualism, or Wim Wenders Enfilms Pina Bausch” appeared in Lisa Patti and Tijana Mamula’s wonderful new collection The Multilingual Screen, published by Bloomsbury. Dance is a notoriously difficult topic to write about because, even more … Continue reading

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Keynote Lecture: Disinventing Monolingualism in Modern Languages Research

TRANSNATIONAL MODERN LANGUAGES The Italian Cultural Institute, 39 Belgrave Square, London, SW1X 8NX Friday 2 and Saturday 3 December 2016 Teaching and research in Modern Languages are conventionally structured in ways which appear to insist on national or linguistic specificity. Work … Continue reading

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New book on multilingual cinema

From Bloomsbury’s publicity blurb: “The Multilingual Screen is the first edited volume to offer a wide-ranging exploration of the place of multilingualism in cinema, investigating the ways in which linguistic difference and exchange have shaped, and continue to shape, the … Continue reading

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New book on interpreting in the KZs

From Bloomsbury’s publicity description: “This significant new study is concerned with the role of interpreting in Nazi concentration camps, where prisoners were of 30 to 40 different nationalities. With German as the only official language in the lager, communication was vital … Continue reading

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Translation in the Digital Age

A lecture for Humanities Week, October 2015. Responses welcome. Video thanks to College of Humanities External Relations and Nate Mehr.  

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